• Users Online: 465
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
CASE SERIES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 176-179

The importance of testing for secretor status of ABH antigens: A case series


1 Department of Transfusion Medicine, St. John's Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohaematology, St. John's Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sitalakshmi Subramanian
Department of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, St. John's Medical College, Sarjapur Road, Bengaluru - 560 034, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijh.ijh_25_21

Rights and Permissions

While simple serological tests such as forward and reverse grouping can help identify rare phenotypes, their Confirmation is to be done with a battery of other serological tests including adsorption elution and nonserological tests such as saliva testing for secretor status. Two cases of H-deficient secretor state (para-Bombay) and one case of a weak B phenotype are presented here highlighting the importance of nonserological tests. Case 1: A 50-year-old male who is a repeat blood donor, with no significant history, had “O positive” by forward grouping, “B” by reverse, and no reaction with anti-AB antisera or anti-H lectin. Adsorption elution showed the presence of weak B antigen and saliva testing confirmed secretor status for B and H antigen. Case 2: A 25-year-old primigravida, with no significant history, had “O positive” by forward grouping, “B” by reverse, and no reaction with anti-AB antisera or anti-H lectin. However, adsorption elution showed the absence of any antigen on RBCs. The saliva testing confirmed secretor status for B and H antigen. Both of them were compatible (Coomb's major and minor) with “B” and “O” units and were grouped as para-Bombay B. Para-Bombay phenotypes can present with complete or partial suppression of ABH antigens and nonserological tests are valuable in their diagnosis. Case 3: A 27-year-old first-time blood donor, with no significant history, also had “O Positive” by forward grouping, “B” by reverse grouping, and no reaction with anti-AB antisera. Furthermore, 3+ reaction with anti-H lectin was noted. Saliva testing confirmed secretor status for B and H antigens. He was also compatible with “B” and “O” units and was grouped as “Weak B.” Further classification was not possible as adsorption-elution tests could not be done.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed256    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded22    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal